Jump to content

Network card requirement for the optical cable of GOM ScanBox 5108


---
 Share

Recommended Posts

---

Dear community,

i'd like to ask whether anyone of you has the information which optical cable - and which network card - is required for the ScanBox 5108. We would like to test another workstation that has by far better CPU performance (and the Nvidia Quadro RTX4000 instead of the P1000) and compare it to our current setup.

In order to plug in the GOMs' optical cable (LWL) into the new workstation we would need a network card, but i can't specify which one would work out, there are a lot of different out there. Also a specification of the cable in the screenshot attached would help us a lot (so which type of LWL cable this is).

Thanks!

Kind Regards

Screenshot 2023-03-06 153422.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

---

Hello Danny,

please note, that we only support measuring with GOM certified systems. Configuring your own system will leave you without support for the PC.

However, the network card is an Intel X520, but the cable is GOM configured and not standard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

---

Please sign in to view this quote.

Hello Karsten, thank you for your quick respond!

Yes a configuration of our GOM PC won't happen, we just want to try out our new HP Z4 workstation we have access to due to 100% load capacity of the current GOM PC (5820 - Workstation with Intel Xeon 3.6 GHz HexaCore CPU) The CPU is on heavy load (rarely under 100% during the scan or polygonization process), which is a bottleneck for our process frequency I guess.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

---

Just a thought danny but if you are looking for efficiency with pcs and measuring what about scanning only during the day and polygonising/ processing during the night?  Or seperate licence needed have the high end pc dealing with evaluation tasks?   In my experience trying to change computers to non gom supported really isnt worth the hassle in the vast majority of cases.   As karsten says if something goes wrong then it can become very difficult to get help and It is unlikely to speed your scan times up .    Polygonisation and evaluation can be power hungry.  Evaluating your process flows and what your inspection is doing  will yield more benefit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

---

Please sign in to view this quote.

Hi James, thanks for your answer! We can't separate the measuring and polygonising process unfortunately due to our high process output and therefore an "asap-need" of the processing results after the scan is finished - the quicker the better. It was just the fact that the CPU and RAM went on 90-100% while processing - which is, following my hardware-understanding, actually a bottleneck to the performance... therefore we just wanted to compare the current setup to another available workstation here, which has a CPU with about 100% more performance than the current one and 128GB RAM instead of 32GB... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

---

Hi Danny , ultimately this is actually a really deep topic.  Each project is different.  I cant go into details but some evaluations are more hungry than others , depending on how they are dealt with internally in the software . Whilst it seems good on paper it may not bring the benefit you seek.   I really would strongly recommend as a start you do a rest of load a mesh into pc 1 and recalc and pc 2 and recalc and time it.   Maybe do the same with just polygonisation .   In theory you could have the seperate pc with additional dongle constantly looking for new files to process from the scanning computer.   Any time that the pc is scanning and doing something else in the background you have chance of it being slower.   The scan times will not change signicantly with higher cpu.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...